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25 ways to increase website traffic

Ask a marketing expert or business owner what they want most, and they’ll likely tell you “more customers.” What typically comes after customers on a business’s wish list? More visitors to their website.

There are many ways to increase traffic to your website. In today’s article, we’ll introduce you to 25 of them, including some ways to increase traffic to your website for free.

1. Advertise

This option is so apparent that we will look at it first. Paid search, social media advertising, and present advertising (try our Smart Ads Creator!) are great ways to attract visitors, develop your brand, and get your website noticed.

Tailor your paid strategies to your goals – do you want more visitors, or do you also want to increase conversions? Each paid network has its pros and cons. Think carefully about your goals before you whip out your credit card.

If you’re hoping that more visitors to your site will also lead to more sales, you must target keywords with high commercial intent as part of your paid search strategies. Yes, competition for these keywords can be fierce (and expensive), but it can be worth it.

2. Get Social

It’s insufficient to produce great content and hope people find it – you need to be proactive. Among the best ways to drive traffic to your website is to use social media channels to promote your content.

Twitter is ideal for short, concise (and enticing) links, while Google++++ can help your site show up in personalized search results, which seems to be especially effective in B2B niches.

If you’re a B2C product company, image-heavy social sites like Pinterest and Instagram can help you attract a lot of attention. Here’s more advice on how to make the most of social media marketing.

3. Mix It Up

There’s no one-size-fits-all recipe for content marketing success, despite what some would have you believe. To vary the length and format of your content to make it as appealing as possible to different readers.

Mix shorter, news-based blog posts with longer content and videos, infographics, and data-driven posts for maximum impact.

4. Write Irresistible Headlines

Headlines are one of the essential parts of your content. Without a compelling headline, even the most extensive blog post won’t get read. Master the art of headline writing.

Think carefully about your headline before you hit “publish.”

5. Pay Attention to On-Page SEO

Think SEO is dead? Wrong thinking. Optimizing your web content for search engines is still a valuable and beneficial technique. Are you making the best use of alt text from images? Are you creating internal web links to new content? What about meta descriptions? On-page SEO optimization doesn’t have to take forever and can help you increase your organic traffic.

6. Target Long-tail keywords

Have you covered your high-intent keywords and popular keywords? Then it’s time to target Long-tail keywords as well. Long-tail keywords make up a large portion of search queries on the internet. That means you’re missing out if you’re not targeting them as part of your paid search or SEO efforts.

7. Start Guest blogging

Before you say it – no, Guest blogging is not dead, although you may have heard it. A guest post on a reputable site can increase blog traffic to your site and incidentally build your brand.

Be warned, though – Guest blogging standards have changed radically in the last eighteen months, and spammy tactics can result in stiff penalties. So proceed with caution.

8. Invite Others to Guest Blog on Your Site

Guest blogging is a two-way street. Don’t just publish content on other blogs; invite people from your niche to blog on your site. They will likely share and link to their guest article, which could bring new readers to your site.

However, make sure you only post quality, original content with no spam links because Google+++ cracks down on low-quality guest blogs.

9. Go After Referral Traffic

Instead of trying to convince other sites to link to you (a tedious and time-consuming process), create content that is just begging to be linked to.

10. Post Content to LinkedIn

LinkedIn has come to be far more than a means to find a new job. The world’s largest social network for professionals is now a valuable publishing platform, which means you should regularly post content on LinkedIn. This can drive traffic to your website and raise your profile in your industry – especially if you have a medium to a huge following.

11. Implement Schema Microdata

Implementing Schema (or any other microdata format) doesn’t necessarily increase traffic to your site, but it does make it much easier for search engine bots to find and index your pages.

Another benefit of using schema for SEO is that it can lead to better rich site snippets, improving click-through rates.

12. Link Internally

The strength of your link profile depends not only on how many sites link to you but also on your internal link structure. When creating and publishing content, look for opportunities for internal links.

Not only does this help with search engine optimization, but it also leads to a better, more helpful experience for the user – the cornerstone for more visitors to your site.

13. Interview Industry Thought Leaders

Do you think interviews are only for the big guys in the industry? Send out emails asking to interview thought leaders in your industry and post the interviews on your blog. You’ll be amazed at how many people agree to talk to you if you ask them.

Not only will the name recognition increase your credibility and drive traffic to your website, but the interviewee will likely share the content, further increasing your reach.

14. Don’t Neglect Email marketing

Many companies focus on attracting new customers via content marketing that they ignore much more traditional methods. Email marketing can be a powerful tool, and even a moderately successful email send can significantly increase traffic.

Just make sure you don’t bombard your customers with constant emails about every single innovation in your business. Also, don’t neglect the power of word-of-mouth marketing, especially from people already using your products or services.

Even a friendly email reminder about a new service or product can help you increase your traffic.

15. Make Sure Your Site is Responsive

When surfing the Internet took location specifically on desktop PCs are long gone, the days. Today, more people than ever are using mobile devices to access the Internet. If you force your visitors to dig and scroll through your website, you’re asking them to go somewhere else.

Even if you have a simple website, you need to make sure it’s accessible and comfortable to view on various devices, including smaller smartphones.

16. Make Sure Your Site is Fast

Have you ever waited thirty seconds for a website to load? Neither have I. If your website takes forever to load, your bounce rate will skyrocket.

Ensure your pages are as technically optimized as possible, including image file size, page structure, and third-party plugin functionality. The faster your website loads, the better.

17. Foster a Sense of Community

People want to speak their minds and express themselves on topics they care about. Therefore, building a community on your website is a great way to start a conversation and drive traffic to your site.

Implement a robust commenting system using third-party solutions like Facebook Comments or Disqus, or develop a specialized discussion forum where visitors can ask questions. However, don’t forget to manage your community to ensure minimum standards of decency are met.

18. Make Yourself Heard in Comment Sections

You probably visit at least a few websites relevant to your business regularly.

Comments don’t necessarily lead to an immediate increase in traffic, but making a name for yourself by writing insightful, thought-provoking Comments on industry blogs and sites is a great way to get your name out there – which in turn can lead to more traffic to your site.

Remember that, as with guest posts, quality and relevance are essential – you should be sharing with other people in your niche and not spamming links on unrelated sites.

19. Examine Your Analytics data

Google Analytics is an important source of information on almost every conceivable aspect of your website, from most popular pages to visitor demographics. Maintain a close eye on your Analytics data and use this information to optimize your advertising and content strategies.

Take note to which posts and pages are proving most popular. Review visitor data to see how, where, and when your website traffic is coming in.

20. Get Active on social media

It’s not enough to distribute content through social channels – you also need to participate in the community actively. Do you have a Twitter account? Then participate in group discussions with relevant hashtags. Does your audience leave Comments on your Facebook posts?

Answer questions and engage with your readers. Nothing scares people away faster than using social media as a broadcast channel – use social media as it’s meant to be used and interact with your fans.

21. Submit Your Content to Aggregator Sites

First, a note: don’t spam on Reddit and other similar sites in hopes of hitting the “jackpot” of traffic because it’s not going to happen.

Members of communities like Reddit are exceptionally savvy about spam disguised as legitimate links. Still, it doesn’t hurt to submit links that this audience will find helpful every once in a while. Choose a relevant subreddit, submit your content, and watch the traffic roll in.

22. Incorporate Video into Your Content Strategy

Text-based web content is all well and good, but videos can be a valuable tool for attracting new guests and making your website more engaging. The information shows that details retention is significantly higher with visuals than text. This means that video marketing is a great way to grab – and hold – your audience’s attention while driving traffic to your website.

23. Research the Competition

You’re at massive cons if you’re not using software like BuzzSumo to discover what your competitors are doing. These services aggregate the social performance of certain websites and content to show you at a glance what topics are resonating with readers and making the rounds on social media in particular.

Search out what people are reading (and talking about) and mimic that kind of content to drive traffic to your website.

24. Host Webinars

People love to learn, and webinars are a great way to share your knowledge with your eagerly waiting audience.

Combined with an effective social media advertising campaign, webinars are a great way to drive traffic to your website. Send out an email about a week before the event and a “last chance to register” reminder the day before the webinar.

Be sure to archive the presentation so you can view it later and promote your webinars on social media. If you’re wondering how to run a webinar, click the link for some tips.

25. Attend Conferences

Regardless of the industry, you’re in, there are probably at least one or two major conventions and conferences relevant to your business. Attending these events is a good idea – speaking at them is even better.

Even a half-decent speaking engagement is a great way to establish yourself as a thought leader in your industry and get your website noticed.

That’s why we’ve created this list of 25 proven tactics that work when trying to generate more leads online. We hope that by sharing our research, we can help you improve your lead generation efforts.

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Managing websites with WordPress

We’re going to set up WordPress to be more suitable for use as a Content Management System. Just before our experts get going, our experts should perhaps inquire what we mean by this WordPress. As many people know, it started life as a piece of software built for blogging, indicating that it was made to do what blogs do – writing and editing posts, commenting, etc.

Over time, however, WordPress has grown and changed a lot, including the fact that it now supports various features. It currently supports numerous features, making it less of a pure blogging platform and more of a tool to create websites with rich content and complex content.

Types WordPress can also be used to publish content multiple times. This means that you can write a piece of content once and then display it in different places without duplicating it, saving time and energy for website editors and making WordPress more CMS-like.

Some Approaches And Methods

There are some approaches and methods that may be put to use – and those are what we’ll concentrate on in this blog post – we’ll start with a brand new WordPress installation. We’re not going to go through the steps leading up to this point. There are many blogs that we’ll discuss how to do that, but we’re at the stage where we’ve run a new installation, and we’re just going to log in now that we’re looking at the dashboard.

Well, first of all, make a few simple adjustments before we get into the details, a little bit more standard, WordPress is installed with a sample post and a sample page, the first thing we’re going likely to do is to get rid of those, while we’re in the pages section, we’ll create two new pages later.

You may need to change or remove them depending on your particular site, but you will need them 99% of the time. So it’s worth doing this now, so first we’ll create a home page by clicking “Add New Page” and calling it “Home” to publish it immediately, and then we’ll add a page called “News,” which we’ll also post in the “Edit Page” screen.

You may have noticed that WordPress displays this box, suggesting that we change the permalinks. This is a good idea because the default setting, which consists of a question mark and a number, is not very user-friendly for either users or Google, which we’re going to change now.

You can either click on this “Change, Permalinks” box here, or you can go to “Settings, Permalinks” and do it there. We’ll choose the month and the name “Save Changes,” and that’s done, now we’re going to point WordPress to the two pages that we created.

We’re going to do that in Settings and Reading, so we’re going to select a static page. It’s going to be the one we created called Home, and our posts page, the one called News, and we’re going to click Save.

So what have we done here? For a blog, you would typically have the list of posts as the home page here. Since we’re thinking of a website with a separate home page on the News page, we’ll tell WordPress to show a static page for the home page and have a separate page that lists the blog or news articles again change that later.

If needed, we take a quick look at the front end to check. Here is our website and you will see. We have a home page and a news page, although obviously, we don’t have any posts yet. You may have noticed about the home page because we have a comment box displayed here at the bottom of the pages for some pages.

That may be what you want, but for the vast majority, it’s likely that you’ll only want comments on posts or news articles and not on the pages themselves, and it’s worth it because now we’re going to populate our site with pages. It makes sense to turn off the comments feature by default, build it outside, and then turn it back on later for new posts.

So let’s go back to our dashboard. We’ll do this in the settings discussion, and then there’s a box here that says: permit individuals to submit comments on brand new posts. 

Therefore we’ll disable that scroll down click save changes now that we’ve disabled, that any new pages that we create won’t have the comments box on them. Still, the two pages that we’ve already created also, so we’ll just quickly change that to go into pages all pages, and we’ll use the quick edit option here, and we’ll disable that.

Allow comments on each of the pages that we created. We’re going to go back to the front end and refresh it, and you’ll see that the comments box is gone.

WordPress Themes

Now we’re ready to go into a little bit of detail. Before we do that, we need to familiarize ourselves with two essential concepts in WordPress. The first of these is a WordPress theme. This is the web. The description of a theme is the analogy of a car. If the core WordPress software is the engine and transmission, then the theme is the body and exterior. WordPress themes are widely available.

If you do a Google, you will certainly find hunt thousand. Some are free, some are paid, or you can create your theme from scratch. A quick word of caution here, it’s generally best to stick to trusted sources for WordPress themes, as some infamous sites offer free themes with a Nasty Virus.

An excellent place to look is the official WordPress theme directory. All of these themes have been checked and vetted, so let’s go here to Appear Themes and go to Install Themes at the top.

This search here will go away and use the official directory. So if we try, this will return all the themes in the WordPress directory that match the keywords, and you can see the variety of themes displayed here. We’ll select one of them: Randomly click install, it will take a minute to download, and then we will activate it.

This theme immediately goes to the front-end of our website, and when we refresh, you’ll immediately see that this rather flashy but very different theme is active. If we go back to our 2020 theme, which is our original one, and activate it, a refresh will come back to the live site, and you’ll see that we’re back to where we were. Themes can also make WordPress work differently.

The WordPress core software is not changed and should not be changed. Themes can change the front-end functionality or the way the dashboard looks and works. The beauty of WordPress themes is that they are, or should be, self-contained in terms of all the CSS.

All of the individual files that make up part of the website are in the themes folder – let’s take a quick look at that now, so let’s go over and look at our WordPress Directory

Here, inside of WP Content, you’ll see a themes folder, and inside of that are the themes that are available to us, the one that we just downloaded child’s play is all in this directory. This is where we covered the basics of themes.

Templates

Let’s talk about templates, so what is a template? Well, think of it as another layout. For example, a simple site might have a homepage template where the content takes up the entire width of the page or a subpage template that has a navigation bar on one page, or a gallery template to showcase projects or products, and so on.

We’re not going to worry about what our templates look like today, but we will look at a powerful way to use WordPress to populate different templates with different content in WordPress

Templates are primarily individual files within our theme, folder and once you’ve added a template and given it, some code tells WordPress that this is a template. This blog post will create templates using the default 2020 WordPress theme, but I will follow best practices by doing what I call a child theme.

To avoid any 2020 updates overwriting the changes I make, the child theme is not covered in this blog, but again, you can find lots of information on the web on how to do this. So first, I’m going to select my child theme under Appearance Themes.

So that’s this one that I created earlier, and I click activate. If we go back to the front-end, you’ll notice that absolutely nothing has changed. All I’ve done is tell WordPress to use the same theme as before.

Only now can I safely make some changes to it without overwriting it with your text or code editor, opens your theme folder, and creates a new file there. It can have any name as long as it doesn’t conflict with any of the WordPress files.

Now we will tell WordPress that this is a template file. To do this, we’ll paste the following code above and also paste the default, header, and footer sidebar code. Our next step is to use the custom fields built into WordPress.

These have been part of WordPress for some time and allow developers to add additional content to any page or post. The problem has been that these are not as user-friendly as they could be. Until today, it was not configurable on a per-template basis, which meant that if you created a custom field on one page, it was visible on all of your pages. 

We will install a powerful plugin called advanced custom fields that will allow us to display fields on a per-template basis to help us with that. It still uses WordPress‘s native custom fields but overlays a user-friendly interface on top of them. It’s a free plugin, but there are options to expand the field types by paying for premium fields.

After installing and activate the plugin, you will undoubtedly see the Custom Fields option here in the left menu, so let’s go to Custom Fields. We’re going to add a new field group and call it Personal Details.

Now we’re going to add three fields: a biofield, which we’re going to make into a WYSIWYG field, a job title field, which we’re going to leave as plain text, and a mugshot as well, this one we’re going to make into an image, and now here’s the perfect thing about the advanced custom fields, which is that you can display these fields depending on a variety of conditions in this field.

Here you may decide to show or even conceal these fields depending on whether it’s a page or a post, whether it’s part of a specific post category or post type, and so on. We’re interested in now showing these fields only when users are editing a page that uses the Staff Details template. To do that, we’ll select “Page Template is the same” and then our Staff Detail Template. 

Before we leave this screen, we’ll also scroll down and check the box next to “Hide on screen” to get rid of our default WordPress “What you see is what you get” field later. You’ll find that you’ll want to do this depending on your particular scenario. Still, we’re going to hide it, for now, so we’re going to click “Publish” and create a new staff member, so we’re going to go to “Pages,” “Add New.” This time we’re going to select “Staff Details” from our template dropdown on the right side here. 

You’ll notice that the edit page is dynamically refreshed when we do this and now shows the three fields we just created, so the biofield up here, a rich text field, a single line of text, and the job title, and our image field. So we’ll add “Jane Smith,” we’ll enter a bio, we’ll enter a job title, and we’ll select an image, and then we’ll click publish, and the staff page on the front end of the website doesn’t show anything yet, but we’ll change that now.

First, we’re going to click back into our custom field, a space that we created, and we’re going to make a note of those field names. So we have Bio Job Underline Title, and Mugshot Advanced Custom Fields created as you go, but you can edit them if you need to. We’ll jump into the personals template and now go put in some code with those in mind.

Advanced custom fields provide some functions, but the ones you’ll use most often are the Get Underscore field and the Underscore field. The former gets the data from your specific field, and the latter displays it. The way you do this is entirely up to you and your programming preferences, but I’m going to fetch the data here at the top of the page and then display it a bit further down.

Now that I’ve got my code in, I’ll click save, go back to our staff page and update it, and it’ll display our three content items precisely as we expect. I have now added another Staff. Member page John Jones with various details filled in published it and you will see. 

As expected, we have the same template but different content populating that template. We’ve only looked at the basics here, but hopefully, you can see how we can now start to create blocks of content that can be assigned to specific templates.

Navigation Menu

This basic functionality can be extended in all sorts of ways. Finally, before we wrap up well, let’s take a look at the main navigation menu. WordPress supports two types of menus. The first automatically add items to the menu as pages are added, and that’s the type we’ve seen so far on our primary site. The second is more manual but allows editors much more control over what these menus display.

We will now use this second option to switch to these appearance menus, assuming our theme supporter can add and activate a custom menu. Choose a menu name, such as top navigation, create the men, select it for our primary menu, and click Save Now. If we go back to our site’s front-end and refresh again, you’ll see that nothing at all is displayed in our primary navigation. To change that, select the items you want, click Add to Menu, and drag and drop them into the order you want.

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